Technology

Microsoft to drop internet requirements, DRM restrictions for XBox One

Credit: Microsoft

Credit: Microsoft

After a public relations nightmare resulting from Microsoft’s decision to have the XBox One require an internet connection, in addition to the system’s DRM restrictions making the sharing and trading of games virtually impossible (in the traditional sense, anyway), the gaming giant has decided to reverse its stance.

The official announcement acknowledges the outspoken reaction of the XBox user community, and recognizes the community’s role in the decision to alter the overall use model for the XBox One.

“You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc,” writes Don Mattrick, President of Interactive Entertainment Business, in a statement posted to the XBox official website. “The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world.”

The statement goes on to lay out the changes for the console:

An internet connection will not be required to play offline Xbox One games – After a one-time system set-up with a new Xbox One, you can play any disc based game without ever connecting online again. There is no 24 hour connection requirement and you can take your Xbox One anywhere you want and play your games, just like on Xbox 360.

Trade-in, lend, resell, gift, and rent disc based games just like you do today – There will be no limitations to using and sharing games, it will work just as it does today on Xbox 360.

This has to be seen as an embarrassment for Microsoft, as their initial approach with the next-gen console blew up in their faces, forcing the media giant to backtrack. And even with this open-access alteration, they still are presenting a console that is $100 more expensive than Sony’s Playstation 4, and $150 more expensive than Nintendo’s WiiU. However, Microsoft at least deserves credit for recognizing the error, instead of sticking to their guns, against the vocal majority of their user base.

What do you think of the news? Will you be purchasing an XBox One? Sound off in the comments!

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