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Game of Thrones – Recap: You’re Mine, and I’m Yours

The things I do for love.

Jaime Lannister’s (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) infamous quote from the very first episode of Game of Thrones certainly came to mind this week during episode seven, “The Bear and the Maiden Fair,” as the one-pawed lion found enough courage left in him to put his own neck on the line for Brienne the Beauty (Gwendoline Christie). Maybe it was the impassioned love scene between The King in the North (Richard Madden) and his queen Talisa (Oona Chaplin). Maybe it was the blazing hot romance between Jon Snow (Kit Harington) and Ygritte (Rose Leslie) that’s now reached levels of scorching that could melt The Wall itself, or the Mother of Dragons’ (Emilia Clarke) unwavering crusade to free the slaves of Yunkai at all costs. Perhaps it was Shae’s (Sibel Kekilli) heartbreak over Tyrion’s (Peter Dinklage) engagement that inspired me to remember what could possibly be the defining quote of the entire series. Game of Thrones brought the love this week, and even little Arya Stark (Maisie Williams) revealed her adoration for her one true god… Death. Something to take notice of prior to starting the review of episode seven; A Song of Ice and Fire series author George R. R. Martin penned this week’s episode. Meaning, fans of the book series will have a chance to see Martin expand upon moments within the text that were insinuated or left to the imagination. This week was very much more so canon, as opposed to the Game of Thrones team’s interpretation of the author’s work.

HBO "Game of Thrones"

HBO “Game of Thrones”

You’re mine, and I’m yours: It’s only fitting to start at the beginning, as Tormund Giantsbane (Kristofer Hivju) lead his team of wildlings past The Wall and on to Castle Black. Still a ways off, Ygritte found herself equal parts enamored with the world of Westeros and the lips of Jon Snow. Maybe it’s the several layers of pelts, but I can’t help but find Ygritte growing increasingly warmer as a love interest for Jon and as a character in general. It’s nice to see the girl smiling without an underlying sentiment of snark. That’s all still there, of course, but the two have shared enough genuine moments at this point to create a compelling and complicated love story.

While Tormund unveiled his virtual Kama Sutra of sex tips to Jon (They have seals in Westeros?), Orell (Mackenzie Crook) took the time spent away from his eagle to admit his feelings to Ygritte, who found herself appropriately shocked. True, Orell isn’t outwardly kind to her, but he could be. The truth is, Jon, whether he’s loyal to their cause or not, was raised within the kingdom under Ned Stark. He doesn’t yet understand fully the ways of the wildlings; they love, support, live, and kill as it serves them. For that reason, Jon may never truly have Ygritte, who seemed to understand why The Skinchanger cut them loose during their ascent of The Wall during the episode prior. Jon, on the other hand, felt betrayed by his comrade. This would later spark an exchange between Jon and Ygritte in which he admitted to foreseeing their future defeat. The wildlings have numbers and heart, but little technique or discipline. They will lose their fight, and they will die as the six Kings Beyond The Wall had before them. Ygritte made sure to remind him that he is, indeed, one of them.

You’re mine, and I’m yours. And if we die, we die. But first, we live.

HBO "Game of Thrones"

HBO “Game of Thrones”

The Prince in the North: Robb and his men continued their march towards The Twins for Edmure Tully’s (Tobias Menzies) wedding to Rosalyn Frey. Rain had delayed their journey, worrying Catelyn Stark (Michelle Fairley) who noted that Walder Frey is a man who is easily slighted by the most trivial of circumstances. This worry sparked a conversation surrounding how generally awful the Freys are, as we’re constantly reminded. As I like to make note in my recaps, the Freys are the worst.

More importantly, Robb and his queen, Talisa, shared a hot and heavy romp in the sack this week. One thing about these two; they have chemistry. It’s difficult to understand the dynamics of the relationship between Robb and his wife in the novel series, mainly because The King in the North doesn’t have his own chapters and his mother, Catelyn, doesn’t witness their personal moments of intimacy. This is what I was referring to when I noted that George R. R. Martin wrote episode seven. Just when the show has us penalizing Robb for betraying his word to the Freys, we witness a moment like this, and we understand. Fine work by Richard Madden and Oona Chaplin here, by the way. As Robb attempted to strategize, and Talisa attempted to distract, we learned of the first good news to come the way of the Starks in a long time. The King in the North is expecting his first child, and that warranted a night off from The Clash of Kings.

HBO "Game of Thrones"

HBO “Game of Thrones”

Joffrey’s moment of clarity?: I have to hand it to Joffrey Lannister Baratheon (Jack Gleeson) this episode. The smartest thing he’s done over the course of the entire Game of Thrones series has been the vocalization of his fear surrounding Daenerys Targaryen and her trio of dragon children. While Tywin Lannister (Charles Dance) seemed to brush off the looming threat as nonsense in the East, referring to her brood of dragons as though they were mere iguanas, Joffrey sat The Iron Throne trembling. There was no mention, of course, of Khaleesi’s newly acquired army of loyal-to-the-death Unsullied warriors, who seem to be, to me at least, the fiercest army in the land. Joffrey was right to anticipate a massive future problem, especially considering the fact that Daenerys’ Achilles’ heel at the moment is time. She needs time for her dragons to grow up! Thus, this is an issue for the Lannisters that must be nipped in the bud now. Then again, Joffrey’s complaint that he would have to walk up stairs to attend council meetings now that Tywin moved the location to his tower might have negated his due credit.

Meanwhile, Tryion and Sansa (Sophie Turner) each attempted to cope with their upcoming nuptials, which hovered overhead like cloud filled with wildfire. Thankfully for Sansa, Margaery Tyrell (Natalie Dormer) is still around to quash her crippling fear and despair, helping the ginger wolf to recognize the good in Tyrion, who’d truly never done her any harm. In fact, Tyrion has been the only Lannister to make Sansa feel welcome and comfortable during her time at King’s Landing. I also want to give kudos to Margaery for pointing out something that nobody has yet to make note of; Tyrion is regarded as grotesque, but Peter Dinklage is a handsome guy! True, as Sansa pointed out, Tyrion is a dwarf, but he’s won battles and he’s brilliant. Their child could become the heir to both Winterfell and Casterly Rock. Let us not forget, the man also knows how to treat a lady in the bedroom. Granted, Sansa is but a girl. Herein lies Tyrion’s conundrum, in that he feels a moral battle within regarding Sansa’s youth. Bronn (Jerome Flynn) saw no issue with age when taking into consideration the fact that Tyrion is but a lord and Sansa is but a lady.

In truth, Tyrion’s true fear surrounding his wedding to Sansa was with regard to his relationship with Shae, who delivered a more than sufficient dosage of heartbreak during episode seven. Shae “the silly whore” had never felt so far beneath Tyrion Lannister, who’d promised her everything from a constantly guarded house to plenty of bastard children to appease her hurt. Shae, needless to say, was devastated by the thought of being shut away for the rest of her life, living as Tyrion’s “other woman” until he fell out of love with her entirely. Then she’d be nothing.

The Wolf and The Hound: Arya Stark sat fuming by the flames as Beric Dondarrion (Richard Dormer) attempted to make amends for sending Gendry (Joe Dempsie) off with Melisandre (Carice van Houten) during the episode prior. Dondarrion seemed truly distraught over his unfortunate, albeit arguably necessary, decision. Thoros of Myr (Paul Kaye), on the other hand, seemed to care very little. They needed gold, so they sold the boy. Dondarrion attempted to reason that they serve The Red God, and they must do as he pleases. Arya serves one god as well, Death. I understood Arya’s immense frustration, of course, but beyond that, the worship of a god that operates as The Lord of Light, especially having heard from Dondarrion’s own lips that there is no afterlife but darkness, is confusing. What is R’hllor, really? Is he merely a source of power with his own agenda? At least Death plays fair.

While Arya attempted to set The Brotherhood without Banners straight, Gendry made his way to Dragonstone with Melisandre aboard a ship. The poor boy has no idea what he’s in for. Melisandre attempted to explain his destiny, from his birth in Flea Bottom to his rise to greatness, revealing his father to be King Robert of House Baratheon. It was also very interesting to hear The Red Priestess’ story of her own past and how R’hllor brought her from slavery to “enlightenment.”

In the end, Arya managed to scamper her way out of the hands of The Brotherhood while they prepped to raid a Lannister camp. If Arya Stark is rooting for the Lannisters, you know you’ve pissed… her… off. Arya jetted into the woods under the cover of darkness, only to find herself in very different predicament; she was captured by The Hound (Rory McCann)! Let’s all take a moment to recognize how amazing it is going to be to watch these two stuck together.

Theon’s favorite part: The torture got taken to a whole new level for Theon Greyjoy (Alfie Allen), who has become privy to the ways of his mysterious and maniacal captor (Iwan Rheon). After two beautiful women were sent in to arouse Greyjoy, I felt my stomach sink. I couldn’t help but theorize regarding what cruelty was to follow, but how could it have been anything else? Once Theon found himself unwillingly erect, the lunatic revealed himself from the shadows. He’d discovered Theon’s “favorite part,” and he would do away with it. We didn’t actually get to see the man do the “cutting,” so there’s no telling if this was mere mental torture or a truly heinous promise fulfilled, but no scene during episode 7 got my heart beating quite as quickly as this one.

Wights are worse than Freys: As Jojen Reed (Thomas Sangster) continued to walk Bran (Isaac Hempstead-Wright) through the stages of recognizing his abilities, Osha (Natalia Tena) found herself growing increasingly wary of the boy’s intentions and his filling of the little wolf prince’s mind with “black magic.” Jojen, of course, seems to be a very positive spirit guide to Bran, who consequently seems to be growing increasingly at ease with his gifts. There was no way Osha was about to trust Jojen in his journey past The Wall and onward to find the three-eyed crow, when she made a promise to Maester Luwin to see Bran safely to Jon Snow at Castle Black. We, of course, no Jojen is correct in his belief that Jon was not there. Still, there was no denying that Osha’s tale, of witnessing her lover’s return to her wildling hut as a wight, was both terribly tragic and foreboding. She has a right to not want to return to the lands beyond The Wall.

HBO "Game of Thrones"

HBO “Game of Thrones”

Now Get Out: Daenerys Targaryen has her sights set on Yunkai, The Yellow City of Slaver’s Bay, as she continues her quest to acquire the greatest army of all time. Ser Jorah (Iain Glen) advised our Khaleesi to avoid the city entirely for fear of losing men as a cost for conquering that which they did not need. Daenerys, though, has begun a war of her own, and she will see her mission to end slavery in the East through.

Dany called upon a representative from Yunkai, another slave master who was requested to meet in order to declare the city’s surrender to her cause. Two-hundred-thousand slaves were to be freed and given amnesty under the rule of The Khaleesi. The man brought gold and promised ships to return Daenerys and her men to Westeros, “where she belongs.” Dany had her own requests; not only were the slaves to be freed, but they were to be given all of the clothes and food they could carry in order for the masters to repent for their inhumane maltreatment. Unfortuantely, Yunkai would not bend to the will of Dany, who noted to Ser Barristan (Ian McElhinney) that when something doesn’t bend, it, well, you know…

HBO "Game of Thrones"

HBO “Game of Thrones”

I appreciated how Game of Thrones is showing the development in the bond between Dany and her children during Season 3. The dragons seem to know her wills and ways, even going as far as to defend the gold that was, indeed, gifted to her when the man’s slaves attempted to take it back for him. That’s the thing about the mythical creatures of Game of Thrones. They have a sense of human nobility about them.

I will show you no mercy.

HBO "Game of Thrones"

HBO “Game of Thrones”

The Bear and the Maiden Fair: They aren’t even a couple, but the relationship between Brienne and Jaime has bred some rare breed of love, hasn’t it? Jaime attempted to say his goodbyes to Brienne before making his way back to King’s Landing with Roose Bolton’s (Michael McElhatton) men at his side. Brienne’s fate remained ominous. In the end, she made The Kingslayer promise to fulfill his duty in returning Sansa and Arya to her mother, before giving a tearful farewell of her own. Jaime, surprisingly, couldn’t even utter the words.

HBO "Game of Thrones"

HBO “Game of Thrones”

After traveling a good ways from Harrenhall, Jaime began questioning the fate of his unlikely ally. Unfortunately, he came to learn that although her father offered three hundred gold dragons for her safe return, the men wanted no part of his offered ransom. Perhaps they wanted sapphires from the Sapphire Isle, Tarth, or perhaps they simply wanted to toy with Brienne for a night. Jaime would have none of it. With a promise to see his companions heavily rewarded by his father, Jaime made his way back to Harrenhall, only to find Brienne battling a bear with a wooden sword in a pit as an audience of men cackled from the stands. By the time he arrived, Brienne already looked terribly banged up, sporting a an awful claw gash across her neck. Jaime wasted no time jumping into the arena to help her any way that he could. Of course, he was unarmed and crippled, leading us to realize that this was a completely selfless moment of unbridled honor, the honor Brienne had been searching for since they set out on their journey together. Luckily, Lannister’s men managed to push the bear away with crossbows long enough for Jaime to hoist Brienne to safety and for her to subsequently pull him up. The final altercation between Jaime and the man who’d severed his hand was certainly satisfying, as Jaime claimed Brienne as his companion and threatened the man with all the might of House Lannister. Part of me wanted Jaime to repeat the notorious close to Game of Thrones’ premiere episode. “The things I do for love,” followed by a strong push that would send the scoundrel to his doom in the pit below. After all, none of this was the bear’s fault, and he looked hungry!

What did you think of Game of Thrones Season 3 Episode 7, “The Bear and the Maiden Fair”? Do you sympathize with Robb now that we’ve seen him and Talisa get intimate, or was his decision to wed her unforgiveable? Is Dany’s quest to free the slaves of Slaver’s Bay an admirable one, or is she taking things too far considering that her claim is to Westeros? Are you excited for the anticipated pairing of The Hound and Arya? Which couple is your favorite Game of Thrones romance? Should they have waited to play the punk version of “The Bear and the Maiden Fair” for the close of this week’s episode?

Thanks for reading my Recap and Review of Game of Thrones Season 3 Episode 7, “The Bear and the Maiden Fair”!

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